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California’s Carpet Stewardship Program

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From the USGBC California Regional Chapter:

Carpet alone is 3.2% of what is disposed of in California, according to the 2008 Statewide Waste Characterization Study. EPA ran the numbers on green house gas emissions and concluded for California that carpet is #4 in having the most GHG impact of any product after lumber, mixed paper, and cardboard. Most carpet is made from petroleum based products like nylon, and can be recycled indefinitely.

For all these reasons and the fact that existing carpet recyclers were laying off employees, in 2010 California passed a law, AB 2398, to increase landfill diversion and recycling of post-consumer carpet generated in California. The law requires all carpet manufacturers to add a stewardship assessment fee of $0.05/square yard onto all carpet sold in the state as of July 1, 2011.

Funds from this assessment fee will be used to increase carpet reuse and recycling, improve the recyclability of carpet, and, most importantly, grow the market for secondary products made from post-consumer carpet.

The Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE) estimates that over 400 million pounds of carpet are discarded in California every year. This legislation was supported by many stakeholders – from local governments and entrepreneurs to carpet mills — because it will create jobs, save valuable resources, and reduce the need for more landfills and the associated costs to society.

The law requires all manufacturers, importers, distributors, wholesalers and retailers who sell carpet into California to participate, and there is a penalty for non-compliance.

For additional information on this from the USGBC California Regional Chapter,  follow me »

For information on the California Carpet Stewardship Program from the California.gov CalRecycle website,  follow me »

For information on the Carpet America Recovery Effort and AB2398 – California Carpet Stewardship Bill,  follow me »




Energy 101: Wind Turbines

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Developed for over a millennium, today’s wind turbines are manufactured in a range of vertical and horizontal axis types. The smallest turbines are used for applications such as battery charging or auxiliary power on sailing boats; while large grid-connected arrays of turbines are becoming an increasingly large source of commercial electric power. The use of wind turbines can be a great way to provide a source of clean and renewable energy for your home or business. There are a number of small wind energy devices that you can use to generate power and these can be very cost effective in providing a significant level of electricity. The demand for wind turbines for homes has been increasing over the past few years due to people wanting to seek alternative energy sources. Energy sources such as solar and wind power are being sought after as a way to cope with the ever increasing electricity bills.

As with solar systems, wind powered systems can be used in two ways: off-grid or on-grid. Off-grid is when your home or business is entirely disconnected from an electric utility company and you generate all of the electricity your home or business requires. An on-grid wind power system sends all of its electricity back into the public electrical network (grid) which the electric company gives you credits for. At the month, the electric company sums up your credits with how much your home or business has consumed, and issues rebates if you consumed less than you put into the grid.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s website ENERGY.GOV has a wealth of information as it relates to Science & Technology, Energy Sources, Energy Efficiency, the Environment and Prices & Trends. The EPA series of short videos related to Energy 101 topics are being posted on studio4llc.com to present entry level information related to Home Energy Assessment, Cool Roofs, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Solar PVs and Wind Turbines.

Please visit the Home>Portfolio>Video Gallery to view this video.




Energy 101: Solar PV

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Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems can generate clean, cost-effective power anywhere the sun shines. PV panels convert the energy of the sun into renewable electricity to power homes and businesses. A small solar electric or photovoltaic (PV) system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or business. And they’re becoming more affordable all the time. Small PV systems also provide a cost-effective power supply in locations where it is expensive or impossible to send electricity through conventional power lines.

As with wind powered systems, solar PV systems can be used in two ways: off-grid or on-grid. Off-grid is when your home or business is entirely disconnected from an electric utility company and you generate all of the electricity your home or business requires. An on-grid wind power system sends all of its electricity back into the public electrical network (grid) which the electric company gives you credits for. At the month, the electric company sums up your credits with how much your home or business has consumed, and issues rebates if you consumed less than you put into the grid.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s website ENERGY.GOV has a wealth of information as it relates to Science & Technology, Energy Sources, Energy Efficiency, the Environment and Prices & Trends. The EPA series of short videos related to Energy 101 topics are being posted on studio4llc.com to present entry level information related to Home Energy Assessment, Cool Roofs, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Solar PVs and Wind Turbines.

Please visit the Home>Portfolio>Video Gallery to view this video.




Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps

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An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe “loops” containing water. This edition of Energy 101 explores the benefits Geothermal and the science behind how it all comes together.

The California Energy Commission also has an excellent in-depth analysis on geothermal heat pumps. follow me »

The U.S. Department of Energy’s website ENERGY.GOV has a wealth of information as it relates to Science & Technology, Energy Sources, Energy Efficiency, the Environment and Prices & Trends. The EPA series of short videos related to Energy 101 topics are being posted on studio4llc.com to present entry level information related to Home Energy Assessment, Cool Roofs, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Solar PVs and Wind Turbines.

Please visit the Home>Portfolio>Video Gallery to view this video.




Energy 101: Cool Roofs

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Environmentally friendly “Cool Roofs” reflect the sun’s heat,  reduce both building cooling loads, lower utility bills, reduce the urban heat island effect and drastically reduce the amount of waste going into landfills.

Cool roofs for commercial and industrial buildings fall into one of three categories: roofs made from inherently cool roofing materials, roofs made of materials that have been coated with a solar reflective coating, or green planted roofs.

Cool roofs are one of the quickest and lowest cost ways we can reduce our global carbon emissions. Roofs and road pavement cover 50 to 65 percent of urban areas. Because they absorb so much heat, dark-colored roofs and roadways create what is called the “urban heat island effect,” where a city is significantly warmer than its surrounding rural areas. Cool roofs significantly reduce the heat island effect and improve air quality by reducing emissions. A recent study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help reduce the demand for air conditioning, cool entire cities, and potentially cancel the heating effect of up to two years of worldwide carbon dioxide emissions.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s website ENERGY.GOV has a wealth of information as it relates to Science & Technology, Energy Sources, Energy Efficiency, the Environment and Prices & Trends. The EPA series of short videos related to Energy 101 topics are being posted on studio4llc.com to present entry level information related to Home Energy Assessment, Cool Roofs, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Solar PVs and Wind Turbines.

Please visit the Home>Portfolio>Video Gallery to view this video.




Energy 101: Home Energy Assessment

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A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time.

A home energy checkup helps owners determine where their house is losing energy and money – and how such problems can be corrected to make the home more energy efficient. A professional technician – often called an energy auditor – can give your home a checkup. You can also do some of the steps yourself. Items shown here include checking for leaks, examining insulation, inspecting the furnace and ductwork, performing a blower door test and using an infrared camera.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s website ENERGY.GOV has a wealth of information as it relates to Science & Technology, Energy Sources, Energy Efficiency, the Environment and Prices & Trends. The EPA series of short videos related to Energy 101 topics are being posted on studio4llc.com to present entry level information related to Home Energy Assessment, Cool Roofs, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Solar PVs and Wind Turbines.

Please visit the Home>Portfolio>Video Gallery to view this video.




Life in the Cubicle Village

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No fried food: Health Dept. workers cringe at new rules restricting foods, fragrances, decorations

A few days ago in the Current News & Events section I posted the link re: Your nose knows: Does your workplace pass the sniff  test, proclaiming my ignorance regarding the subject of workplaces in Canada adopting policies to control fragrances in the workplace. Well now, controlling fragrances, and much more, is coming to the U.S. of A, compliments of New York City. No overbearing perfume. No obscene pictures. And definitely no French fries for work lunches. And, employees should avoid eavesdropping. Via NYDailyNews.com., workers at the new NYC Department of Health facility are being furnished with a set of guidelines. Perhaps we can term these as Green Workstyles? follow me »




BMW i Sustainable Neighbourhoods Project

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Wallpaper* and BMW i are giving six creative teams the opportunity to help write the future of their urban environment. The cities of the 20th century were shaped by transport, public and private; the challenge of the 21st is to keep Megacities moving. Over the course of six months, Sustainable Neighbourhoods will explore, chronicle and research six different city zones, with the aim of defining a new infrastructural, cultural or social project that will scale seamlessly into the future.  The cities include London, Paris, Beijing, Los Angeles, Tokyo and Berlin with populations of 13 M, 2.1 M, 22 M, 3.8 M, 13 M and 3.4 M respectively.  follow me »

If you are wondering why BMW is co-sponsoring this event, a clue may be found in their marketing tag for the new “i” sub-brand – This is BMW i. Born Electric.  As Forbes recently wrote – BMW’s Newest Model Isn’t a Car 




LEED Credential Maintenance Program (CMP)

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In 2009 the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) launched LEED  and, compared to its predecessor LEED v2, the new face put on LEED represents a major overhaul from the top down.  LEED v3 includes LEED 2009, an upgrade to LEED Online and an expanded certification model.

An overview comparison between LEED v2 and LEED v3:

The LEED Credential Maintenance Program (CMP) can be downloaded here  »




Overview Analysis for the LEED Green Associate Exam

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The material and information in this document constructs a more detailed perspective of the LEED process than what is presented in the Studio4 6 Step Study Plan for the LEED Green Associate Exam. Many exam candidates begin their exploration into the study process completely overwhelmed by the volume, perceived complexities and, on occasion, inconsistencies and contradictions with available study resources, often starting out in a confused and misguided direction.

It would be difficult to comprehend the information necessary to pass the Green Associate exam without fully understanding the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and the mechanisms established under USGBC’s control – the Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) and the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Rating Systems. Simply reading the vast amount of material defining each doesn’t necessarily provide the matrix that connects each and how this pyramid functions. As disconcerting as this may seem, perhaps it would be helpful if we developed our analysis of LEED, as a whole, as compared with something more familiar. Shortly it should become apparent the role of the U.S. Green Building Council with regard to environmental stewardship and the organized green movement.

The Overview Analysis for the LEED Green Associate Exam can be downloaded here.




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