Neighborhood Development

What is Smart Growth?

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Smart buildings. Smart cities. Smart growth. What’s the meaning of all this “smart” talk? In the most basic sense, all three are associated with sustainability and social responsibility, with smart buildings and smart cities individually and collectively supporting smart growth.

So what is smart growth, and why is it important? With respect to sustainability and social responsibility, smart growth is of critical importance. In 2010, 82 percent of Americans lived in urban communities (towns and cities) and by 2050 it will be 90 percent. For the first time in history, more than half of the people on Earth live in cities, and urban populations are projected to double by mid-century. Towns and cities are responsible for approximately 65 percent of all energy used, 60 percent of all water consumed and 70 percent of all greenhouse gases produced worldwide. As compared to less densely populated rural areas, urban communities offer increased potential for resolution of environmental and social problems, generate jobs and income, relieve pressure on natural habitats and areas of biodiversity, and with proper governance they can deliver education, health care and other services more efficiently. In essence, smart growth is about urbanization.

Enter smart growth.

The challenges presented by sustainable urban development are immense. Smart growth, an urban planning and transportation theory, values long-range, regional considerations of sustainability over a short-term focus. Its goals are to achieve a unique sense of community and place; expand the range of transportation, employment, and housing choices; equitably distribute the costs and benefits of development; preserve and enhance natural and cultural resources; and promote public health. Utilizing growth management tools to encourage sustainable communities, combat sprawl, and strengthen urban centers through existing infrastructure, smart growth is supported by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and many other environmental organizations, such as Smart Growth America. USGBC promotes smart growth through their LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System and the EPA’s support is focused around their EPA Smart Growth Program.

The EPA has compiled a set of best-practice examples of adopted codes and guidelines from around the U.S. that support smart growth, grouped into six categories:  Continue Reading →




China’s Ghost Cities and Malls

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With all the current reporting that China may be in freefall, I thought it appropriate to refresh this report from 2011. China was trying to game the world into believing they had a robust economy as indicated by their increased auto production and crazy construction projects. The results were predicted: large parking lots to mothball their cars and cities few could afford to rent and shopping malls with few retailers.

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This excellent reporting provides shocking visuals and commentary exposing the issues people, and the government, are faced with by China forcing lifestyles on the population. If there is any lesson to be learned here, it illustrates the fact that if you build it, they will not necessarily come. Or perhaps in these instances… if you build it, they can not necessarily come!

Is China’s rapid and forced development of new cities and infrastructure, with little or no demand, a poor decision to increase GDP? Is it deepening social divisions?

h/t Wizbang:

What happens when a government focuses on infrastructure projects and nothing else? In one case, you get Chinese Ghost Towns! This is what happens when you ignore real market pressures, and focus on just building crap that nobody can afford. This could happen here. Make no mistake, this could be the United States.  Continue Reading →