Posts Tagged ‘Teran Residence’

Teran Residence – the history

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In April 2009, Rookwood Building Group was approached by a client interested in purchasing a residential building site in the historic Cincinnati hillside community of Mt. Adams. Formerly known as Mt. Ida, its name changed to Mt. Adams in 1843, after John Quincy Adams visited the area to dedicate the world’s most powerful observatory. Mt. Adams sits on one of Cincinnatis seven hills, with commanding views of Cincinnati and the Ohio River. The area was once a working-class neighborhood, populated with blue-collar employers such as an iron foundry, wooden shoe and fireworks factories, the Rookwood Pottery Company, a vineyard and limestone quarries. Mt. Adams once sat 100 feet higher before having its topography changed by mining activities.

Today, given the enchanting diversity of architecture, the steep, narrow streets and the scenic views of Cincinnati and the riverfront, Mt. Adams is highly prized by professionals working in the city and creative individuals such as writers and artists. Other than the commute to work, which for most is a short drive down the hill into the city, everyone walks.

Walk to the dry cleaners, the convenience store, Playhouse in the Park, Eden Park, and to the numerous restaurants and bars. Over the years, several serious attempts have been made to reconstruct the Mt. Adams Incline, running up the hill from the city to Mt. Adams from 1872 until 1948. Older properties suitable for rehab or demolition are overpriced when they do become available. The streets are narrow and parking is extremely limited. Builders frequently have to notify the police department to post no parking signs and, on occasion, shut down a street when large deliveries are scheduled. Typical lot widths in Mt. Adams are 25 feet, with zero to 3 foot side yard setbacks. Get a site located on a hillside and you’ve got your hands full.

After months of detailed research of every available property that fit within the client’s program, a vacant site was selected. The property is approximately 23 feet in width and 126 feet in depth, with 25 feet of fall in grade, front to back and right to left. Soil reports would later confirm the suspected bad to treacherous conditions found in many of the city’s hillside districts. So bad in fact that zoning will not permit any fill depth greater than 18 inches above existing grades. Cincinnati is known for its seven hills, slipping and sliding as they do. However, this is the good news, as all it usually takes to marginalize the issue is money, and lots of it. The client was somewhat fortunate in their purchasing negotiations, given the history of the property and the devastated state of the housing market at the time. The current owner the client was buying the property from had himself purchased the property only one year prior, as an investment. An investment to build a market home from architectural plans the (original) owner previous to him had prepared only two years prior. During the original owner’s negotiations with zoning and building officials, property swaps were made between the city and property owner, utility poles and lines were rerouted. All for the protection of an existing building to the east (right side) – the monstrous Art Academy of Cincinnati. The Art Academy building, a Romanesque Revival school house built in 1894 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was home to the Art Academy of Cincinnati, the museum school of the Cincinnati Art Museum. In 1973 it became the first home for the School for Creative and Performing Arts, Cincinnati’s first magnate school and the first school in the country to combine art studies with a complete college prep academic program. Nick Lachey and Rocky Carroll are two of the schools graduates.

Finally after two years of planning and negotiating, zoning was approved, construction plans were submitted for permitting, and a building permit issued. Having achieved this at a substantial expense, the original owner scraps his investment plans and decides to sell the property, after he had demolished the original house. Then comes along a new owner who gives up his investment plans after a year of watching the housing market fall to lows not seen in Cincinnati since the late 70’s and early 80’s. The client’s ownership of the property included the building plans from two owners past, as well as zoning approval and building permits. So, with this in mind, what the client was also getting was zoning approval and a building permit issued for the construction of a single family residence, within an approved zoning envelope. With the client’s building program established, a preliminary design and budget analysis was presented that was in compliance with the approved zoning envelope and the client’s general program. The initial review of the preliminary with zoning officials of the site plan, floor plans, building elevations and a color rendering was encouraging. As long as the project stayed within the approved zoning envelope, there shouldn’t be a problem receiving zoning approval for the client’s new design. Satisfied with the preliminary design and construction budget, and with the understanding of the potential zoning risks, a contract to purchase the property was successfully negotiated and the client purchased the property.




Teran Residence – the approval processes

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Having prepared the conceptual plans for this residence, it was requested that I make a presentation to the client explaining the merits of a LEED for Homes green construction policy. This perhaps was the easiest sell I had ever been involved in during the all the years working in the residential sector. The City of Cincinnati offers tax incentives to commercial and residential projects that achieve LEED certification. A 15 year tax abatement up to $500,000 for any level of certification. Five minutes and it was a done deal. The client agrees to go for the Certified level at an estimated additional construction cost of $5,000 – $8,000.

After several months of revisions to the building program and with construction documents well underway, the client called one evening to inform her builder she wanted the house moved further back on the site. Ouch. OUCH! Informed that doing so not only pushed the structure further above existing grades at the rear, it moved the project outside the approved zoning envelope, which would necessitate going back to zoning for a variance. The client agreed with this and issued instructions to proceed to zoning.

Now the bad news. Zoning ordinances for the hillside overlay district had been revised since the previous approval, with several requirements being stricter. Now for the really bad news. The Art Academy property had been sold to a developer who was in the process of completing a major renovation of the property – new high end condos. We now had residential zoning on both sides. The foundation of the house on the west (left side) was positioned on the property line, while the Art Academy had a 75 foot setback. The Art Academy is situated at an intersection and, consequently, has two front yards, or perhaps one is a side yard and the other a front yard? Or may be no one knew. Zoning would later reveal they never really understood just how to handle the uniqueness of this building and our project. At any rate, construction documents had to be prepared, complete with new envelope studies and submitted to zoning for a lengthy review and variance process.

With respect to LEED for Homes projects, preparing site engineering and working drawings at this stage is akin to putting the cart before the horse. As for this project, there is less comfort now that this project will receive zoning approval. All aspects of design and construction are under review and subject to change by zoning officials. Project size, building design including exterior materials are at risk and subject to change. However, having experience building homes in Mt. Adams, as well as having a sound knowledge of LEED, there wasn’t a great deal of concern or gamble. If the project was approved as submitted, adding the necessary LEED content to the final construction documents would be a minimal task.

Our written as well as our oral argument to zoning was singular in focus and intentionally short. Side yard setback requirements are calculated as the average of adjoining properties on either side. In our instance, if current zoning ordinance setback requirements were interpreted and imposed as written, our 23 foot wide parcel would be rendered unbuildable. Averaging the two adjacent side yard setbacks produced a setback larger than the width of the property. Now for good news. After a protracted process, zoning approval was granted and the construction documents were submitted to the city and a building permit issued.




Teran Residence – the design

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Note: Using Autodesk Revit BIM software, Rookwood modeled this rendering from the original project scope 

The site is approximately 23 feet in width at the front and 126 feet in depth with 25 feet of fall toward the rear, with approved side yard setbacks of 0 feet on the west (left) and 18 inches on the east (right). However, the foundation of the residence to the west is on the property line and poses a concern with the new construction jeopardizing the integrity of the old foundation. We get a bit of a break on the right side due to the fact that the Art Academy has a 2 foot wide x 20 foot high stone wall running parallel to the common property line, but 6 foot inside the property line, creating a no-man zone. The builder had been advised by his soils testing engineer that he should maintain a 5 foot wide zone where no heavy equipment

would be allowed to trespass. Apparently the old stone wall began to fail some time back and had to be reinforced with concrete buttresses and a concrete wall overlay in sections. The final plan places both foundation walls 1’-6” off each side property line. This required obtaining approval for site access to the rear from adjacent property that fronts on a street much lower in elevation.

The building footprint, small for a 4,080 sf building, measures 20’-8” wide x 72’-0” long. The foundation is designed with 10” thick x 14’-0” high, heavily reinforced poured concrete foundation walls pinned to (13) 36” diameter x 35’ deep (deepest) and (2) 24” diameter reinforced concrete piers, embedded 10’ into the bedrock below.­­ The location of the frame structure on the side of the sloped site created additional structural concerns that necessitated the design of an extensive matrix of interior shear walls. The soils testing and structural engineers were commissioned to inspect and report every phase of the site and structural work done under their engineering direction.

This home has (4) finished levels, including the finished lower level walkout. With the garage placed in front of the main four story rectangular frame, the client wanted a two car garage with a single 16 foot wide garage door. Unfortunately, the garage door width plus the width required for the front entry door was wider than what we had available, so the garage door had to be reduced to a 15 foot unit. There are rear decks at each of the (4) levels and the roof of the garage serves as a deck accessed from the main kitchen. This was not included in the original design. Level 0 is the lower level walkout and has a bedroom, bath and unfinished area; Level 1 is where the master bedroom and bath, laundry and garage are located; Level 2 is the main area for visitors and defines the kitchen, powder room, dining room and living room spaces; Level 3, at one of the highest elevations in Mt. Adams, strategically locates the family room, secondary kitchen, a den, bedroom and bath. The home also has a four level elevator.

 

                          

 

 




Teran Residence – the green design

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There was no direction offered by the client with regard to their green perceptions or expectations. In fact, there was little green discussion whatsoever, other than leaving it up to the project team to design and incorporate responsible green strategies into their new home. As we inform all clients, in the end, local building codes, prerequisites and durability items addressed by the LEED for Homes Green Building Rating System and quality construction practices take care of the vast majority of what is needed to deliver an entry level green home. Toss in a few optional sustainable credits and the builder will deliver to their client a LEED Certified home.

However, this only turns the keys over to the client for a high performance green home. The new homeowner must understand, as with a new car, they have to learn how to drive and maintain it in order to achieve the performance over time they expected when they made their purchase decision. Drive irresponsibly without performing maintenance on that new car, and the owner will likely be disappointed and blame the car for not performing to the level of their expectations. A high performance green home is no different. It is essential that the builder provide sufficient education to the new homeowner as to their responsibilities.

Aside from performing the customary first take of the Project Checklist to analyze the probability of achieving all the mandated rating system prerequisites, a quick check of all the given credits, aka low hanging fruit, will establish the current credit tally. This is used to compare to the required credit points that must be achieved in order for the project to be certified at the targeted level.

A quality builder will generally always install higher performing doors and windows, upgrade mechanical equipment such as the heating and air conditioning systems, as well as the water heater. All exhaust fans are vented to the exterior and faucets, showerheads and toilets are upgraded to water efficient devices. Keep the exterior grade sufficiently below the top of the foundation and oversee proper weatherproofing systems like flashing, water or moisture proofing poured concrete foundation walls, foundation drainage, hurricane hold-down straps for the truss to top plate connection, increased insulation and caulking. A typical days’ work for any quality builder.

However, there will be some credits that may not be included in the builder’s usual and customary product. We picked up a credit point for installing a coat rack and bench in the Garage at the entry point to the Laundry Room, all flooring within 3 feet of major entry points is hard surface hardwood or ceramic, no use of interior wall studs for HVAC ducting and low VOC interior paints and coatings. These are items that can be easily done. Now, we just need to see how many of these additional points we need to pick up.

From the beginning, the intent of seeking LEED certification was to receive the tax abatement offered by the city. However, as previously stated, the fact is that basic LEED certification requires little more than code compliance in most communities and good, sound construction policies. With this in mind, designers, builders and clients should consider that small extra step and employ green building principles into the project for green certification.




Teran Residence – the LEED process overview

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Another reason this project is probably not a typical model for illustrating the LEED for Homes process is due to the fact the builder, being both a design and build company, interfaced directly with the client, providing project design, construction documents and construction activities. This circumvents the usual role of the architect and eliminates the initial disconnect between client and builder, making the process more transparent and fluid.

This is not meant to diminish the role of an architect. Quite the contrary, the architect can provide value and needed professional services to their clients. It’s just a fact there are many capable and talented design/build companies available. However, one advantage a design/build company may have over the traditional architectural firm is that the designer is the builder, and the builder is the designer – they readily know what does and doesn’t work, removing conflicts between architect and builder. The custom residential design/build firm offers respectable levels of equity to both parties.

LEED for Homes has a unique set of differences from all other LEED rating systems. First, the project team registers the project with USGBC, not GBCI. This is the one and only communication the project team will ever have with USGBC, and absolutely none with GBCI. Second, LEED Online is not available to LEED for Homes projects – digital or hard copy document submittals only. Third, and most importantly, is the verification process. USGBC hands this responsibility to, not GBCI, but another third party, the LEED for Homes Provider. Providers, under the control of USGBC, are responsible for working with LEED for Homes projects and administering a team of Green Raters who, together with the Provider organization, verify that homes are built to meet the requirements of the LEED for Homes Rating System. Builders or developers must contact a LEED Green Rater organization.

After it has been agreed to seek LEED for Homes certification, the builder should contract with a LEED for Homes Provider. With the Provider established and a meeting to review the project completed, the project team should register the project with USGBC. During registration, the name of the Provider must be selected from a list of USGBC approved Providers. Fill out the remaining information, pay the registration fee and USGBC will forward registration verification with an access code, specific to this project. This access code can be shared with other project team members.

With or without the assistance of the Provider, the project team will begin the review of the LEED for Homes Project Checklist. Although not required at this point, it is recommended the builder meet with the LEED for Homes Provider if they are unfamiliar with the certification process. A capable Provider can save the builder enough money in the initial meeting to offset their fees by offering guidance for no cost or low cost credits and creative credit management. At some point, the Project Checklist will be complete enough to establish the credits necessary to achieve the level of certification targeted. The Project Checklist should be given to the Provider for review and tweaked as necessary. When all parties are comfortable the pathway to success has been defined, the construction documents should be revised to reflect any revisions necessary to implement sustainable credit strategies. With this completed, construction can begin.

There are two mandatory inspections required by the Provider. Independent of the Provider is the third party verification team – the Green Raters. The Provider is under the control of USGBC and the Green Raters are under the control of the Provider. The Green Raters verify, either by mandated on-site inspections or review of documents, photographs and calculations, compliance with all requirements of the prerequisites and credits. They report their findings to the Provider for review, who in turn reports their decision to USGBC that the project has or has not met the requirements for certification. USGBC then reviews the Provider’s report and issues the final ruling. The first mandatory on-site inspection is performed after installation of insulation and prior to installation of the drywall. Remedial action by the builder will follow, if necessary. The final on-site inspection is scheduled at the completion of the project. Additionally, a blower door test must be conducted.




Teran Residence – the LEED project checklist

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We’ve arranged the initial meeting with our selected Provider and reviewed the project history and construction documents. The LEED for Homes Project Checklist was reviewed, credit by credit. All prerequisites were checked off and the low hanging credits selected. This gave us an initial credit point total to compare with the required baseline points for the Certified level. Large homes get hammered by the Home Size Adjustment that is automatically calculated based on the number of bedrooms and total square footage of the home.

Certified level requires achieving a minimum 36.5 credit points for a baseline 4 bedroom home and an allowable size of 2,600 sf. Our project has 4 bedrooms at 4,080 sf. The Home Size Adjustment calculator lifted the minimum credit points required for the Certified level from 36.5 to 56.5. Another OUCH! A crucial area addressed in the initial meeting was the Durability Inspection Checklist.

Durability is a prominent and mandatory part of LEED for Homes in that it requires certain aspects of the home be detailed with sustainable strategies that address the durability and life of a home’s components – roof, walls, weatherproofing, etc. Additional measures may be required subject to regional issues such as tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, pests, soil conditions, climate, etc. After this initial review meeting, we’ve assessed the situation and all parties feel the project is in great shape for success.

In order to better understand the sustainable strategies as related to the construction process, let’s take a quick summary review of the LEED for Homes Project Checklist. A copy of the blank LEED for Homes Project Checklist (MS Excel xls format) can be downloaded from USGBC here.

The LEED for Homes Project Checklist has a series of tabs (sheets) located at the bottom of the spreadsheet. The first tab is the Project Summary where relevant and basic is manually entered. Enter the number of bedrooms and floor area (calculated outside to outside of exterior walls and includes any space that can be legally used as a bedroom, including unfinished areas) and the Home Size Adjustment automatically calculates the number of credit points that must be added to or subtracted from the targeted level of certification. The Provider offered recommendations for the EA pathway best suited for the project and, additionally, the HERS Index rating information.

The second tab is the heart and soul of the rating system – the LEED for Homes Project Checklist. This is where the entire team determines if all the prerequisites can be achieved and evaluates what optional credits the project should pursue. Three columns, “YES” “MAYBE” and “NO”, are provided adjacent to the column that lists the points available for any specific credit. As the project team goes thru the categories, credit by credit, the Project Total located at the top of the sheet populates, provides an instant summary of the preliminary “YES” and “MAYBE” points to compare with the points required. The checklist also lists, in each category header, the maximum points allowed and the minimum points required for that particular category. Taking a minute to skip down the list of tabs is the LEED for Homes Simplified Project Checklist. This sheet is automatically populated by the working checklist to provide a summary report without all the details offered by the working checklist.

Given the importance of the mandated Durability Inspection Checklist to sustainable strategies related to specific credits, it’s advantageous to simultaneously work with both the Project Checklist and Durability Checklist. A credit could possibly apply to addressing durability issues and, likewise, it’s possible that addressing durability issues could be applied to credit achievement. Also, several of the Durability categories are regulated by the Durability Evaluation Form. This is where Site, Climate and other issues are recorded and will determine the extent and number of strategies per issue are required to address regional characteristics related to radon, soils, pests, heating/cooling days, wind, tornadoes, hurricanes, etc. It’s very important that we enter this data early in order to achieve the required degree of durability. The spreadsheet includes a Durability Guidelines summary of instructions and valuable information about why durability is important and how to effectively address durability concerns. An Example Durability Strategies tab includes sample strategies for all Durability Categories. The LEED for Homes Project Checklist devotes (4) sheets to Durability – it is that important, as well it should be.

LEED for Homes allows the project team to be accountable for verifying certain credits via the Accountability Form. A mandated list of credits is provided where a member of the project team signs off verifying requirements of the credit had been properly designed and/or installed. An Accountability Form Creator Tool is available for the project team to add whatever disciplines are necessary for their project.

The Calculator for Percent Reduction in Outdoor Water Demand is a tool that must be used by the landscape architect or landscape contractor to ensure their design meets the requirements for reducing the amount of water used for landscaping as selected in the Project Checklist. These calculations had to be done as early as possible due to the amount of time required for verification.

This concludes a brief overview of the initial process we conducted. As you can see, it is not a difficult task, but one made complicated by all the forms, interaction of credits as well as the coordination and interaction of project team members. To ensure every member of the project team fully understood their role critical to the success of this project, a LEED Project Checklist Guideline document was prepared and forwarded to every contractor, material supplier, vendor and other entities that provided any service to the project. The importance of an informed and integrated project team cannot be overstated.




Teran Residence – the LEED guideline specs

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THE FOLLOWING HAD BEEN CREATED FOR, AND DISTRIBUTED TO, EACH PROJECT STAKEHOLDER. THE LIST INCLUDES ALL PREREQUISITES AND TARGETED CREDITS; THE PREREQUISITE/CREDIT NUMBER; THE PREREQUISITE/CREDIT INTENT; THE PREREQUISITE/CREDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPLIANCE (AND THE OPTIONAL PATH SELECTED); THE INTEGRATED PROJECT TEAM MEMBERS; THE VERIFICATION AND SUBMITTALS REQUIRED; THE CALCULATIONS REQUIRED  AND THE PROJECT TEAM MEMBER(S) RESPONSIBLE FOR VERIFICATION AND SUBMITTALS. IN ADDITION AN ADDITIONAL LIST WAS PREPARED THAT PROVIDED A CORRELATION BETWEEN THE LEED REQUIREMENTS AND THEIR APPROPRIATE CSI DIVISION NUMBER. The following prerequisites and credits have been preliminarily targeted for consideration on this project and are subject to final review and confirmation by the project team:

Innovation and Design Process (ID): Max: 11 points / Min: 0 points / Y: 3 points / M: 1 point

ID 1: Integrated Project Planning

ID 1.1 Preliminary Rating: prerequisite (0 points)

Conduct a preliminary LEED for Homes meeting with team members to create an action plan that establishes a targeted level of certification and select the team members accountable for each selected credit.

Integrated Project Team Members:

GBC, Rookwood

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

ID 1.2 Integrated Project Team: credit (1 point)?

Assemble and involve a project team to:

a)     Include team members whose capabilities include:

1. Residential building design

2. Green building or sustainable design

3. Civil engineering

b)     Actively involve all team members in the following phases of design and construction:

1. LEED planning

2. Final design and specifications

3. Construction

c)     Coordinate monthly project team meetings

Integrated Project Team Members:

All interested stakeholders providing materials, products and/or services, Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Present a list of project team members to the Verification Team

Present a list of meeting dates or plans for regularly scheduled meetings to the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood – Integrated project team members to provide Rookwood verification of qualifications

ID 2: Durability Management Process

ID 2.1 Durability Planning: prerequisite (0 points)

Prior to construction, the project team shall:

a)      Complete the Durability Risk Evaluation Form to identify all moderate and high-risk durability issues for the building enclosure

b)      Develop specific measures to respond to those issues

c)       Identify and incorporate the following  indoor moisture control measures:

1. Tubs, showers and spa areas: Use nonpaper faced backer board on walls

2. Kitchen, bathroom, laundry rooms and spa areas: Use water-resistant flooring; do not use carpet

3. Entryway (within 3 feet of exterior door): Use water-resistant flooring; do not use carpet

4. Tank water heater in or over living space: Install drain and drain pan

5. Clothes washer in or over living space: Install drain and drain pan or install accessible single throw supply valve

6. Conventional clothes dryer: Exhaust directly to outdoors

7. Condensing clothes dryer: Install drain and drain pan

d)    Incorporate the measures from ID 2.1 (b) and ID 2.1 (c) above into the project documents, specifications and/or scope of work

e)    List all durability measures and indicate their locations in the project documents in a durability inspection checklist

Integrated Project Team Members:

All ID 2.1 (c) and durability inspection checklist interested stakeholders, Refer durability inspection checklist for complete listing

Verification and Submittals:

Complete and submit the Durability Evaluation Form to the Verification Team

Include durability measures in project documents

Develop and submit a completed durability inspection checklist

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood – Integrated project team members to provide Rookwood all necessary documentation, including Accountability Forms

ID 2.2 Durability Management: prerequisite (0 points)

The builder shall have a management process in place to ensure installation of the durability measures and shall inspect and check off each measure in ID 2.1 (c) above.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Present documentation of quality management processes to the Verification Team or conduct an inspection of durability measures in the home and indicate the completion of the inspection on the durability inspection checklist

Ensure that all applicable measures in ID 2.1 (c) and durability inspection checklist were installed

Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

ID 2.3 Third Party Durability Management Verification: credit (3 points)

Have the Verification Team inspect and verify each durability measure listed in the durability inspection checklist as noted in ID 2.1 (c) above and as indicated in the durability inspection checklist.

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Homes+

Location and Linkages (LL): Max: 10 points / Min: 0 / Y: 10 points / M: 0 points (?)

LL 2: Site Selection

LL 2 Site Selection: credit (2 points)

Do not develop buildings, built structures, roads or parking areas on portions of sites that meet any of the following criteria:

a)      Land whose elevation is at or below the 100 year floodplain as defined by FEMA

b)      Land that is specifically identified as habitat for any species on federal or state threatened or endangered lists

c)       Land within 100 feet of any water, including wetlands as defined by U.S. Code of Federal Regulations 40 CFR, and isolated wetlands or areas of special concern identified by state or local rule, or land within distances given in applicable state or local regulations, whichever is more stringent

d)      Landthat prior to acquisition for the project was public farmland

e)      Land that contains prime soils, unique soils or soils of state significance as identified in state Natural Resources Conservation Service soil surveys

Integrated Project Team Members:

Soils testing engineer, civil engineer, Rookwood

Calculations:

At least 95% of the site must meet the criteria as listed

Verification and Submittals:

Provide all necessary soil and site data to the Verification Team

Sign an Accountability Form verifying that the site meets all stipulations of the credit

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

LL 3: Preferred Locations

LL 3.2 Infill: credit (2 points)

Select a lot such that at least 75% of the perimeter immediately borders on previously developed land.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Civil engineer, Rookwood

Calculations:

Estimate the percentage of the total site that immediately borders previously developed land

Verification and Submittals:

Present any relevant calculations to the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

LL 3.3 Previously D: credit (1 point)?

Build on a previously developed lot.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Present any relevant calculations to the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

LL 4: Infrastructure

LL 4 Existing Infrastructure: credit (1 point)

Select a lot that is within ½ mile of existing water service lines and sewer lines.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Civil engineer, Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

If necessary, provide local maps and documents to the Verification Team verifying the proximity of the home to existing water and sewer infrastructure

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

LL 5: Community Resources/Transit

LL 5.3 Outstanding Community Resources/Transit: credit (3 points)

Select a site that meets the following criteria:

b)     Located within ½ mile of 14 basic community services

Integrated Project Team Members:

Rookwood

Calculations:

The distance requirements must be calculated based on walking distances

Up to two of each type of community resource may be counted

Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present maps and/or a list of community resources to the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

LL 6: Access to Open Space

LL 6 Access to Open Space: credit (1 point)

Select a location within ½ mile of a publicly accessible or community based open space that is at least ¾ acre in size. The open space requirement can be met by either one large open space or two smaller spaces totaling ¾ acre.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Present maps and/or directions to the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

Sustainable Sites (SS): Max: 22 points / Min: 5 / Y: 7 points / M: 7 points (?)

SS 1: Site Stewardship

SS 1.1 Erosion Control During Construction: prerequisite (0 points)

Prior to construction, design and plan appropriate erosion control measures and during construction, implement these measures, which must include the following:

a)      Stockpile and protect disturbed topsoil from erosion (for reuse)

b)      Control the path and velocity of runoff with silt fencing or comparable measures

c)       Protect on-site storm sewer inlets, streams and lakes with straw bales, silt fencing, silt sacks, rock filters or comparable measures

d)      Provide swales to divert surface water from hillsides

e)      If soils in a sloped area (i.e., 25% or 4:1 slope) are disturbed during construction, use tiers, erosion blankets, filter socks or berms or some other comparable approach to keep soil stabilized

Integrated Project Team Members:

Civil engineer, site contractor, Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Ensure that required erosion control measures have been installed

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

SS 1.2 Minimize Disturbed Area of Site: credit (1 point)

Minimize disturbance to the site by meeting the following:

d)      Build on a site with less than 1/7 of an acre

Integrated Project Team Members:

Civil engineer, Rookwood

Calculations:

Calculate acreage of site

Verification and Submittals:

Provide calculations that lot is less than 1/7 of an acre

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

SS 2: Landscaping

SS 2.1 No Invasive Plants: prerequisite (0 points)

Introduce no invasive plant species into the landscape.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Landscape contractor

Verification and Submittals:

Present a list of plants being used and a list of local invasive plants (and/or list of non-invasive plants) to the Verification Team

If no landscape professional is involved in the project, sign an Accountability Form to indicated that the plants that are installed match those on the list provided to the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Landscape contractor

SS 2.2 Basic Landscape Design: credit (2 points)?

Meet all of the following requirements for all designed landscape softscapes:

a)      Any turf must be draught tolerant

b)      Do not use turf in densely shaded areas

c)       Do not use turf in areas with a slope of 25% (i.e., 4:1 slope)

d)      Add mulch or soil amendments as appropriate

e)      All compacted soils (e.g., from construction vehicles) must be tilled to at least 6”

Integrated Project Team Members:

Landscape contractor

Verification and Submittals:

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the requirements have been met

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Landscape contractor

SS 2.5 Reduce Overall Irrigation Demand by at Least 20% (max. 6 points): credit (6 points)?

Design the landscape and irrigation system to reduce overall irrigation water usage. Estimates must be calculated and prepared by a landscape professional, biologist or other qualified professional using the methods as outlined in the LEED for Homes Reference Guide and Water Demand Calculator for Percent Reduction in Outdoor Water Demand (calculator included with the LEED for Homes checklist).

Integrated Project Team Members:

Landscape contractor

Calculations:

20-24% = 2 pts.; 25-29% = 3 pts.; 30-34% = 4 pts.; 35-39% = 5 pts.; 40% and greater = 6 pts. Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present calculations to the Verification Team

Present a list of plants being used to the Verification Team

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the installed landscape and irrigation system corresponds to the design used in the calculation

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Landscape contractor

SS 3: Local Heat Island Effects

SS 3 Reduce Local Heat Island Effects: credit (1 point)

Reduce local heat island effects by:

a)      Install light colored, high albedo materials or vegetation for at least 50% of sidewalks, patios and driveways within 50’ of the home

ii.     Gray concrete

iv.   Any material with a solar reflectance index (SRI) of at least 29

Integrated Project Team Members:

Pavement material supplier and/or pavement contractor, Rookwood

Calculations:

Calculate the percentage of nonroof light colored hardscape = light colored hardscape / total area of hardscape. Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present calculations to the Verification Team demonstrating the percentage of the sidewalks, patios and driveways that is high Albedo

Present specifications or test results demonstrating the SRI value

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that material choices meet the requirements of the credit

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Pavement contractor

SS 4: Surface Water Management

SS 4.2 Permanent Erosion Controls: credit (1 point)?

Design and install the following permanent erosion control measure:

b)      Plant one tree, four 5-gallon shrubs or 50 sf of groundcover per 500 sf of disturbed lot area (including area under roof)

Integrated Project Team Members:

Landscape contractor

Calculations:

Calculate tree, shrub and/or groundcover. Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present calculations to the Verification Team demonstrating the number of trees or shrubs or groundcover required by the credit

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Landscape contractor

SS 5: Nontoxic Pest Control

SS 5 Pest Control Alternatives: credit (1/2 point each = 2 points)

Implement the pest control measures as listed. All physical actions (for pest management practices) must be noted on construction plans.

b)     Seal all external cracks, joints, penetrations, edges and entry points with caulking. Where openings cannot be caulked or sealed, provide rodent and corrosion proof screens. Protect exposed foundation insulation with moisture resistant, pest proof cover (e.g., fiber cement board, galvanized insect screen)

c)     Include no wood-to-concrete connections or separate any exterior wood-to-concrete connections (e.g., at posts, deck supports, stair stringers) with metal or plastic fasteners or dividers

d)     Install landscaping such that all parts of mature plants will be at least 24” from the home

e)     In areas marked “moderate to heavy” through “very heavy” on the termite infestation probability map, implement the following measure (1/2 point each)

vi) Use solid concrete foundation walls or masonry wall with a top course of solid block bond beam or concrete filled block

Integrated Project Team Members:

Framing contractor, insulation contractor, landscape contractor, Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Visually verify that all relevant measures are complete

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

SS 6: Compact Development

SS 6.2 High Density: credit (3 points)

Build on a 1/10 acre buildable lot.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Civil engineer, Rookwood

Calculations:

Calculate buildable lot area

Verification and Submittals:

Present calculations to the Verification Team demonstrating the density of the project

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

Water Efficiency (WE): Max: 15 points / Min: 3 / Y: 3 points / M: 4 points (?)

WE 2: Irrigation System

WE 2.3 Reduce Overall Irrigation Demand by at least 45%: credit (4 points)?

Design the landscape and irrigation system to reduce overall irrigation water budget. Estimates must be calculated and prepared by a landscape professional, biologist or other qualified professional using the methods as outlined in the LEED for Homes Reference Guide.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Landscape contractor

Calculations:

Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present irrigation demand calculations to the Verification Team

Present a list of plants being used to the Verification Team

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the installed landscape and irrigation system corresponds to the design used in the calculation

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Landscape contractor

WE 3: Indoor Water Use

WE 3.1 High Efficiency Fixtures and Fittings: credit (1 point)

Meet the requirement by installing high efficiency (low flow) fixtures or fittings.

c) Toilets must meet the U.S. EPA WaterSense specification and and be certified and labeled accordingly

Integrated Project Team Members:

Interior designer, plumbing fixture supplier, plumbing contractor

Verification and Submittals:

Include any equipment literature in the occupant’s operations and maintenance manual

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Plumbing contractor

WE 3.2 Very High Efficiency Fixtures and Fittings: credit (2 points)

Meet the requirement by installing very high efficiency low flow fixtures or fittings

a)      Lavatory faucets must meet the U.S. EPA WaterSense specification and and be certified and labeled accordingly

Integrated Project Team Members:

Interior designer, plumbing fixture supplier, plumbing contractor

Verification and Submittals:

Include any equipment literature in the occupant’s operations and maintenance manual

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Plumbing contractor

Energy and Atmosphere (EA): Max: 38 points / Min: 0 / Y: 16 points / M: 0 points (?)

EA 1: Optimize Energy Performance

EA 1.1 Performance of ENERGY STAR for Homes: prerequisite (0 points)

Meet the performance requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes, including third party inspections:

HVAC equipment must be designed and sized using ACCA Manual J, the ASHRAE 2001 Handbook of Fundamentals or an equivalent procedure

If a heat pump is installed with a programmable thermostat, the thermostat must be equipped with adaptive recovery

Thermal bypass inspection (i.e., an insulation inspection before the drywall is installed)

Visual inspection of all installed energy efficiency measures

Performance tests, including overall envelope tightness and duct tightness

Integrated Project Team Members:

All interested stakeholders, including the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Homes+

EA 1.2 Exceptional Energy Performance: credit (13 points)

Exceed the performance requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes. Use the in the LEED for Homes Reference Guide relating the Home Energy Standards (HERS) Index to the appropriate number of LEED points.

Integrated Project Team Members:

All interested stakeholders, including the Verification Team

Calculations:

No calculations are required beyond those performed by the HERS energy mode. Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present any equipment or product literature (e.g., user manuals, brochures, specifications) related to the energy consuming systems and energy saving components (e.g., HVAC equipment, windows, insulation, appliances) to the Verification Team

Include all equipment literature in the occupant’s operations and maintenance manual

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Homes+

EA 7: Water Heating

EA 7.1 Efficient Hot Water Distribution: credit (2 points)

Design and install an energy efficient hot water distribution system. None of the branch length requirements below apply to cold water demand loads (e.g., toilets), washing machines or tubs without showerheads:

c )   Compact design of conventional system that must meet all of the following:

i)     No branch line from the water heater to any fixtures may exceed 20 feet in one story homes. Add 1x the ceiling height for two story homes and 2x for three or four story homes

ii)    Branch lines from the central header to each fixture must be a maximum ½” nominal diameter

Integrated Project Team Members:

Plumbing contractor, Rookwood

Calculations:

In a multi story home, the maximum allowable branch length differs for each story. Branches to 1st floor fixtures may not exceed 20 feet; branches to 2nd story fixtures may not exceed 20 feet + 1x the story height; branches to 3rd story fixtures may not exceed 20 feet + 2x the story height; etc. Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the hot water distribution system is installed according to the credit requirements

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Plumbing contractor

EA 11: Residential Refrigerant Management

EA 11.1 Refrigerant Charge Test: prerequisite (0 points)

Provide proof of proper refrigerant charge of the air conditioning system.

Integrated Project Team Members:

HVAC contractor

Verification and Submittals:

Present the refrigerant charge test results to the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

HVAC contractor

EA 11.2 Appropriate HVAC Refrigerants: credit (1 point)?

c )   Install an HVAC system with non HCFC refrigerants (e.g., R-410a).

Integrated Project Team Members:

HVAC contractor

Verification and Submittals:

Present information related to the type of refrigerants (e.g., cooling system user manuals, brochures, specifications) to the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

HVAC contractor

Materials and Resources (MR): Max: 16 points / Min: 2 / Y: 6 points / M: 0.5 points (?)

MR 1: Material Efficient Framing

MR 1.1 Framing Order Waste Factor Limit: prerequisite (0 points)

Limit the overall estimated waste factor to 10% or less. If the waste factor on any portion of the framing order exceeds 10%, calculate the overall waste factor as shown in the LEED for Homes Reference Guide. Waste factor is defined as the percentage of framing material ordered in excess of the estimated material needed for construction.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Rough framing lumber supplier, rough framing contractor, Rookwood

Calculations:

Waste Factor = (Lumber Ordered – Lumber Needed) + Lumber Needed. Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present calculations for the framing waste factor to the Verification Team

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rough framing lumber supplier

MR 1.5 Off-Site Fabrication: credit (4 points)

Use the following alternative to on-site framing:

a)      Panelized construction. Wall, roof and floor components are delivered to the job site pre-framed

Integrated Project Team Members:

Rough framing lumber supplier, rough framing contractor, Rookwood

MR 2: Environmentally Preferable Products

MR 2.1 FSC Certified Tropical Wood: prerequisite (0 points)

Meet the two following requirements, as applicable:

a)      Provide all wood product suppliers with a notice containing the following element:

  1. a statement that the builder’s preference is to purchase products containing tropical wood only if it is FSC certified

ii.     a request for the country of manufacture of each product supplied, and

iii.    a request for a list of FSC certified tropical wood products the vendor can supply

b)      If tropical wood is intentionally used (i.e., specified in the purchasing documents), use only FSC certified tropical wood products. Reused or reclaimed materials are exempt

Note: A species of wood is considered tropical for the purpose of this prerequisite if it is grown in a country that lies between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn

Integrated Project Team Members:

All suppliers of wood products, interior designer, Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Provide the required notice to all wood product suppliers

Present the wood supplier notice to the Verification Team

Sign an Accountability Form confirming that no tropical woods were used except those that were FSC certified or reclaimed

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood – Integrated project team members to provide Rookwood all necessary documentation

MR 2.2 Environmentally Preferred Products: credit (1/2 point each = 2 points + ½)?

Use building component materials that meet one or more of the criteria below. Except as noted in Table 23, LEED for Homes Reference Guide, a material must make up 90% of the component, by weight or volume. A single component that meets each criteria (i.e., environmentally preferable, low emissions, local sourcing) can earn points for each.

b) Low emissions: Use products that meet the emissions specifications in Table 24

Interior wall, ceiling, millwork, paint (?)

c) Local production: Use products that were extracted, processed and manufactured within 500 miles of the home

Foundation: aggregate

Foundation: cement

Interior wall, ceiling: gypsum board

Landscape: decking and patio

Integrated Project Team Members:

All suppliers and/or installation contractors of materials/products identified, interior designer, Rookwood

Calculations:

To earn 0.5 points, at least 90% of a given component, by weight or volume, must meet the requirements for Environmentally Preferable Products, Low Emissions Materials or Local Production. Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present any relevant product stamps, certification labels and/or literature to the Verification Team as needed to demonstrate that the credit requirements were met

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that each product being counted in this credit represents the required minimum percentage of the applicable component

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood – Integrated project team members to provide Rookwood all necessary documentation

MR 3: Waste management

MR 3.1 Construction Waste Management Planning: prerequisite (0 points)

Complete the following tasks related to management of construction waste:

a) Investigate and document local options for diversion (e.g., recycling, reuse) of all anticipated major constituents of the project waste stream, including cardboard packaging and household recyclables (e.g., beverage containers).

b) Document the conversion rate for construction waste. Record the diversion rate for land clearing and/or demolition, if applicable, separately from the rate for the new construction phase of the project

Integrated Project Team Members:

Waste management company, Rookwood

Calculations:

Document the waste totals with receipts from the waste hauling company, or keep track of waste hauling totals using a simple inventory. Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present documentation to the Verification Team of local waste diversion options

Present calculations to the Verification Team demonstrating construction waste diversion rates, using documentation from the waste management company

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood – Integrated project team members to provide Rookwood all necessary documentation

Indoor Environmental Quality (EQ): Max: 21 points / Min: 6 / Y: 8 points / M: 0 point (?)

EQ 2: Combustion Venting

EQ 2.1 Basic Combustion Venting Measures: prerequisite (0 points)

Meet all of the following requirements:

a) No unvented combustion appliances (e.g., decorative logs) are allowed

b) A carbon monoxide (CO) monitor must be installed on each floor

c) All fireplaces and wood stoves must have doors

d) Space and water heating equipment that involves combustion must meet one of the following:

i) It must be designed and installed with closed combustion (i.e., sealed supply air and exhaust ducting)

ii) It must be designed and installed with power vented exhaust, or

iii) t must be located in a detached utility building or open air facility

Integrated Project Team Members:

All suppliers and/or installation contractors of materials/products identified (e.g., gas operated appliances, fireplaces, water heaters, furnaces)

EQ 2.2 Enhanced Combustion Venting Measures: credit (2 points)

Install no fireplace or woodstove or design and install a fireplace or woodstove according to the requirements in Table 29, LEED for Homes Reference Guide.

a) Fireplaces and stoves shall be listed, power or direct vented with fixed doors

b) Fireplaces and stoves shall have electronic pilots

Integrated Project Team Members:

All suppliers and/or installation contractors responsible for the home’s fireplaces and stoves and fireplace/stove combustion systems, Rookwood

Calculations:

Calculation requires a blower door test. Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present any fireplace or stove equipment literature (e.g., user manuals, brochures, specifications) to the Verification Team for visual inspection

Include fireplace or stove equipment literature in the occupant’s operations and maintenance manual

For best practice with a fireplace or stove, present back draft calculations to the Verification Team

For masonry heaters, sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the product meets the credit

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood – Integrated project team members to provide Rookwood all necessary documentation

EQ 4: Outdoor Air Ventilation

EQ 4.1 Basic Outdoor Air Ventilation: prerequisite (0 points)

Design and install a whole building ventilation system that complies with ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007:

b)  Continuous ventilation. Meet the ventilation requirements in Table 30, LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Integrated Project Team Members:

HVAC contractor

Calculations:

Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Visually verify that all calculations related to outdoor air ventilation are completed

Verify that an Accountability Form has been sign by the responsible party

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

HVAC contractor

EQ 5: Local Ventilation

EQ 5.1 Basic Outdoor Air Ventilation: prerequisite (0 points)

Meet all of the following requirements:

a) Design and install local exhaust systems in all bathrooms (including half baths) and the kitchen to meet the requirements of Section 5 of ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007. Sample requirements that relate to intermittent local exhaust flow rates are shown in Table 31, LEED for Homes Reference Guide

b) Design and install the fans and ducts to meet the requirements of Section 7 of ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007

c)  Exhaust air to the outdoors (i.e., exhaust to attics or interstitial spaces is not permitted)

d)  Use ENERGY STAR labeled bathroom exhaust fans

Integrated Project Team Members:

HVAC contractor

Calculations:

Refer to the LEED for Homes Reference Guide

Verification and Submittals:

Present calculations to the Verification Team demonstrating that the local exhaust system is designed to meet the requirements

Include any equipment literature in the occupant’s operations and maintenance manual

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the local exhaust system is installed according to the design specifications

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

HVAC contractor

EQ 5.2 Enhanced Outdoor Air Ventilation: credit (1 point)

Use the following strategy in every bathroom to control the use of the local exhaust fan:

d) A continuously operating fan

Integrated Project Team Members:

HVAC contractor

Verification and Submittals:

Include equipment literature on occupancy sensors, automatic humidistat controllers, automatic timers or continually operating exhaust fans in the occupant’s operations and maintenance manual

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

HVAC contractor

EQ 5.3 Third Party Performance Testing: credit (1 point)

Perform a third party test of each exhaust air flow rate for compliance with the requirements in Section 5 of ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Homes+

EQ 6: Distribution of Space Heating and Cooling

A.  Forced Air Systems:

EQ 6.1 Room-By-Room Load Calculations: prerequisite (0 points)

Perform design calculations (using ACCA Manuals J, D and S) and install ducts accordingly.

Integrated Project Team Members:

HVAC contractor

Calculations:

ACCA Manuals J, D and S

Model home as “tight” construction

Verification and Submittals:

Present design calculations to the Verification

Include any equipment literature (e.g., user manuals, brochures, specifications) in the occupant’s operations and maintenance manual

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the system is installed according to the design specifications

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

HVAC contractor

EQ 7: Air Filtering

A. Forced Air Systems:

EQ 7.1 Good Filters: prerequisite (0 points)

Install air filters with a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) equal to or greater than 8 and ensure that air handlers can maintain adequate pressure and air flow. Air filter housings must be airtight to prevent bypass and leakage.

Integrated Project Team Members:

HVAC contractor

Verification and Submittals:

Present any air filter product literature to the Verification

Include product literature in the occupant’s operations and maintenance manual

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

HVAC contractor

EQ 8: Contaminant Control

EQ 8.1 Indoor Contaminant Control During Construction: credit (1 point)

Upon installation, seal all permanent ducts and vents to minimize contamination during construction. Remove any seals after all phases of construction are completed.

Integrated Project Team Members:

HVAC contractor

Verification and Submittals:

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the system is installed according to the design specifications

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

HVAC contractor

EQ 8.2 Indoor Contaminant Control: credit (1 point)

Provide the following contaminant control measure(s):

b) Design and install a shoe removal and storage space near the primary entryway, separated from living areas. This space may not have wall-to-wall carpeting and it must be large enough to accommodate a bench and at least two pairs of shoes per bedroom.

Integrated Project Team Members:

Lumber supplier, finish carpentry contractor, Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the system is installed according to the design specifications

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

EQ 9: Radon Protection

EQ 9.1 Radon Resistant Construction in High Risk Areas: prerequisite (0 points)

Design and build the home with radon resistant construction techniques as prescribed by EPA, the International Residential Code, Washington State Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code or some equivalent code or standard.

Radon resistant construction strategies include five components: a gas permeable layer, heavy gauge plastic sheeting, sealing and caulking of all penetrations through the concrete slab and a vent pipe to exhaust gases from under the slab

Integrated Project Team Members:

Concrete contractor, plumbing and/or HVAC contractor, insulation and caulking contractor, Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that the home was built with radon resistant construction

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

EQ 10: Garage Pollutant Protection

EQ 10.1 No HVAC in Garage: prerequisite (0 points)

Place all air handling equipment and ductwork outside the fire rated envelope of the garage.

Integrated Project Team Members:

HVAC contractor

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

None required

EQ 10.2 Minimize Pollutants from Garage: credit (2 points)

Tightly seal shared surfaces between garage and conditioned spaces, including all of the following:

a) In conditioned spaces above the garage:

 I. Seal all penetrations

ii. Seal all connecting floor and ceiling joist bays

iii. Paint walls and ceilings

b) In conditioned spaces next to the garage:

I. Weather strip all doors

II. Place carbon monoxide detectors in adjacent rooms that share a door with the garage

III. Seal all penetrations

IV. Seal all cracks at the base of the walls

Integrated Project Team Members:

Insulation contractor, HVAC contractor

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

None required

Awareness & Education (AE): Max: 3 points / Min: 0 / Y: 0 points / M: 1 point (?)

AE 1: Education of the Homeowner or Tenant

AE 1.1 Basic Operations Training: prerequisite (0 points)

Provide the home’s occupant(s) with the following:

c) An operations and maintenance manual or binder that includes all of the following items:

  1. The completed checklist of LEED for Homes features

ii. A copy of each signed Accountability Form

iii. A copy of the durability inspection checklist

iv.  The product manufacturer’s manuals for all installed equipment, fixtures and appliances

v. General information on efficient use of energy, water and natural resources

vi. Operations and maintenance guidance for any LEED for Homes related equipment installed in the home, including:

Space heating and cooling equipment

Mechanical ventilation equipment

Humidity control equipment

Radon protection system

Renewable energy system

Irrigation, rain water harvesting and/or greywater system

vii. Guidance on occupant activities and choices, including the following:

Cleaning materials, methods and supplies

Water efficient landscaping

Impacts of chemical fertilizers and pesticides

Irrigation

Lighting selection

Appliance selection

d) A minimum one hour walkthrough of the home with the occupant(s), featuring the following:

i.  Identification of all installed equipment

ii. Instruction in how to use the measures and operate the equipment

iii. Information on how to maintain the measures and equipment

Integrated Project Team Members:

Home Owner(s), Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Present the operations and maintenance manual to the Green Rater for review

Provide the operations and maintenance manual to the occupant

Sign an Accountability Form to indicate that a walk through has been conducted with the occupant

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

AE 1.3 Public Awareness: credit (1 point)?

Promote general public awareness about LEED for Homes by conducting at least three of the following activities:

a) Hold an advertised, attended public open house that lasts at least four hours per day on at least four weekends, or participate in a green building exhibition or tour. The home or building must display at least four informational stations about LEED for Homes features and/or offer a guided tour that highlights at least four LEED for Homes features

b) Publish a website with at least two pages that provides detailed information about the features and benefits of LEED homes

c) Generate a newspaper article on the LEED for Homes project

d) Display LEED for Homes signage, measuring six sf or more, on the exterior of the home or building

Integrated Project Team Members:

Rookwood

Verification and Submittals:

Provide open house dates, website address and/or newspaper citation to the Green Rater

Project Team Member(s) Responsible for Verification and Submittals:

Rookwood

SUPPLEMENTAL LEED CERTIFICATION NOTES:

1. Division 1: General Requirements

1.1. Integrated project team requirements

1.1.1. Only contracts for products, materials, equipment and/or services awarded by Rookwood Building Group, LLC are authorized to perform on this project

1.1.2. Comply with all prerequisites and credits as listed herein and also noted in the LEED for Homes checklist; each project team member is responsible for understanding and providing the products, equipment and services necessary for compliance, whether detailed herein or not; the current version of the LEED for Homes Reference Guide shall be used to determine prerequisite and credit compliance requirements; contact Rookwood if any conflicts exist between the LEED for Homes Reference Guide and this document

1.1.3. Provide Rookwood with manuals for installed equipment, fixtures and appliances

1.1.4. Provide Rookwood and Client operational instructions, as required, for installed equipment, fixtures and appliances

1.1.5. Provide Rookwood with a signed copy of the Accountability Forms, as required per prerequisite or credit

1.2. All products and materials shall be protected from moisture which could be cause for mold; any products or materials with visible signs of mold shall not be used

1.3. Waste management shall include the separation and recycling of paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics and metals

2. Division 2: Site

2.1. Protect site from erosion during construction as required

2.2. No regional invasive plant species, as defined by the local Agricultural Cooperative Extension Service, shall be installed

3. Division 3: Concrete

3.1. All foundation walls reinforced poured concrete

3.2. Level 0 concrete slab perimeter expansion joints and slab penetrations and slab openings shall be sealed with polyurethane caulk

3.3. Level 0 concrete slab to be places over 10 mil poly vapor barrier with 6” minimum lap at edges over minimum 6” washed ¾” diameter gravel; control joints at 10’-0” maximum spacing each way; slope towards floor drains

3.4. Garage concrete slab to slope towards vehicle opening

3.5. All exterior slabs to slope 1/8” per foot away from foundation

4. Division 4: Masonry

4.1. Install moisture membrane and weep systems behind all masonry walls

5. Division 5: Metals

6. Division 6: Woods and Plastics

6.1. Notice to all wood product suppliers:

6.1.1. Builder’s preference is to purchase products containing tropical wood only if FSC certified

6.1.2. Request for country of manufacture of each wood product supplied

6.1.3. Request of list of all FSC certified products vendor can supply

6.2. All window and door headers have been designed for the specific span and load condition so as to maximize performance and minimize the unnecessary use of materials

7.  Division 7: Thermal and Moisture Protection

7.1. All wood in direct contact with concrete to be treated; foam sill sealer to be placed under all treated plates in direct contact with concrete

7.2. Install 2 mil CERTAINTEED “Membrane” breathable polyethylene vapor retarder on warm side of insulation in exterior walls; tape all seams

7.3. Install moisture membrane and weep systems behind all masonry walls

7.4. Install TYVEK R-2 Thermawrap to all exterior wall sheathing; TYVEK tape at all vertical seams

7.5. Install TYVEK Flexwrap tape, or approved equal, at all window and door openings for pan flashing at sills, side flashing that extends over pan flashing and head flashing that extends over side flashing

7.6. Provide silicone caulk around all window and door openings

7.7. Install downspout lines with 4” diameter schedule 40 PVC ties into existing storm sewer system

7.8. Install 4” diameter schedule 40 perforated PVC drain tile at perimeter of foundation walls; tie into existing storm sewer system

7.9. All finished lower level foundation walls to be damp proofed per drawings

7.10. Install insulation in full contact with the air barrier and continuous alignment with the air barrier

7.11. Install ½” thermoply at all dead spaces in walls and at ceilings at finished room side to seal exterior wall insulation (e.g., walled dead spaces, fireplace walls, under tub decks, under shower benches, dropped ceilings, soffits)

7.12. Install full insulation and air barrier on unconditioned side of all walls that adjoin conditioned spaces

7.13. There shall be no holes or gaps in insulation that would facilitate air leakage

7.14. Exterior walls of all living spaces shall be enclosed on all six sides and fully insulated

7.15. Tightly seal all foundation penetrations

7.16. Ducts, piping, shafts and penetrations to unconditioned spaces shall be sealed with blocking, caulk and/or foam

7.17. Flue shafts shall be fully sealed with flashing and fire rated caulk or sealant

7.18. All recessed lighting into insulated spaces (e.g., roof truss space) shall be airtight and sealed to drywall with gasket, caulk or foam

7.19. Homes+ will perform the following:

7.19.1. Energy analysis to obtain the HERS INDEX which determines the energy performance above IECC 2004

7.19.2. Thermal bypass inspection and certification prior to installation of drywall

7.19.3. Blower door envelope air leakage test prior to occupancy

7.19.4. Duct leakage test

8. Division 8: Doors and Windows

9. Division 9: Finishes

10. Division 10: Specialties

10.1. All fireplaces shall be prefabricated with glass doors and direct vent to the exterior

11. Division 11: Equipment

11.1. All refrigerators, dishwashers and clothes washers shall be ENERGY STAR rated

12. Division 12: Furnishings

13. Division 13: Special Construction

14. Division 14: Conveying Systems

15. Division 15:

15.1. Mechanical

15.2. Plumbing Equipment and Fixtures

15.2.1. No plumbing runs shall be installed in exterior walls

15.2.2. All interior supply lines to be copper and pressure tested for leakage

15.2.3. All hot water supply lines to be wrapped with R-4 insulation, including elbows

15.2.4. Install radon mediation system with 3” diameter PVC vent pipe and motorized exhaust fan; PVC vent shall extend 5 feet below concrete floor slab and 12 inches above roof; install 10 mil vapor barrier under concrete floor slab

15.3.Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning

15.3.1. Perform Room-by-Room calculations; ACCA Manual J, D and S calculations shall be performed; home shall be modeled as “tight” construction

15.3.2. All ventilation shall be installed per ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007

15.3.3. HVAC contractor shall document installation and testing of proper refrigerant charge

15.3.4. All dryer, toilet room, fireplace and kitchen exhaust systems to be vented to the exterior

15.3.5. All ductwork to be cleaned and air filters changed prior to occupancy

15.3.6. All air handler equipment to be inspected to verify coils are free of construction dust and debris

15.3.7. All ductwork to be sealed; no ductwork allowed in exterior wall; wrap ducts in unconditioned spaces with R-6 insulation; all ductwork to be installed per ACCA Manuals J, D, S and ASHRAE handbooks

15.3.8. Building cavities (e.g., joist and wall spaces) shall not be used for air distribution and return

16.   Electrical

16.1. All recessed lighting into insulated spaces (e.g., roof truss space) shall be airtight and sealed to drywall with gasket, caulk or foam; IC rated (ICAT)

16.2. Install one hard wired, continuous run PANASONIC WhisperGreen exhaust fan in each bathroom

16.3. Install one smoke detector in each bedroom; install one combination smoke/carbon monoxide detectors on every floor outside each bedroom and Laundry Room within audible distance of each bedroom door, lower level and stairs; 110 volt, battery backup with alarm devices such that when one alarm sounds, all alarms will sound

16.4. All ceiling fans to be ENERGY STAR rated

Integrated Team Meetings:

Coordinated meetings will be scheduled for the first Tuesday of each month. Rookwoodwill notify the team members necessary to attend each meeting.

Project Team Members:

Client: Carlos & Roberta Teran

Builder: Rookwood Building Group, LLC (Brian P. Sims)

      • LEED for Homes Provider: Green Building Consulting, LLC (Barb Yankie)
      • Green Rater: Homes +
      • Building Design: Rookwood Building Group, LLC
      • Interior Design: Arbor Living (Michele Nieter)
      • Soils Engineer: Thelen Associates, Inc. (Christopher C. Hamant)
      • Civil Engineer: McGill Smith Punshon (Jerry Kellar)
      • Structural Engineer: Advantage Group Engineers, Inc. (Robin Hahn)
      • Concrete Piers: Scherzinger (Ken Scherzinger)
      • Concrete Foundations: Holcomb Concrete (Bruce Holcomb)
      • Concrete Supplier: Ernst Concrete (Fred Dye)
      • Structural Steel Fabrication and Erection: MC Steel (Mike Colleli)
      • Rough Framing Lumber: McCabe Lumber (Tom Ashpaw)
      • Exterior Windows and Doors: McCabe Lumber (Matt Trumpy)
      • Garage Door: A E Door Sales (Keith Miller)
      • Rough Framing Contractor: Janek Padar
      • Brick & WBFP Supplier: BrickTec (Drew Mueller)
      • Masonry Contractor: Tony Linville
      • Insulation Contractor: Jansen and sons (Boone Jansen)
      • Plumbing Contractor: Dupps Plumbing (Jim Dupps)
      • HVAC Contractor: Willis Heating & Air Conditioning (Scott Rukel)
      • Electrical Contractor: Kelly Electric (Patrick Kelly)
      • Drywall Contractor: DG Drywall (Greg Ruh)
      • Painting Contractor: Weaver Painting (Tim Weaver)
      • Flooring Contractor: McSwain (Melody Schofield)
      • Cabinetry and Built-Ins: J&N
      • Ceramic Tile Supplier: Louisville Tile
      • Ceramic Tile Contractor: Dale Bogemill
      • Exterior Concrete Flatwork: Patterned Concrete (Paul Schnider)



Teran Residence – the Benefits of LEED Certification

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Innovation & Design Process (ID)

The Innovation in Design Process category is significant in the sense it 1) addresses issues that help keep costs down and ensures proper integration of green strategies, 2) assesses and mitigates long term durability risks and 3) rewards the project for overachieving credit requirements or implementing creative green strategies.

  1. Integrated Project Planning
    1. One of the unsung heroes of LEED certified homes is the implementation of an integrated project team with scheduled coordinated project team meetings. Not enough can be said about the importance of the project’s stakeholders convening to collectively coordinate the design and review process. With an integrated project team, most issues can be caught well before it’s too late.
  2. Quality Management for Durability
    1. Durability Planning and Management, simply put, forces the project team to implement strategies, quality materials and construction practices in an effort to extend performance of the home. Durability addresses items most susceptible to premature failure as well as regionally specific issues such as radon, pests, climate, soils, etc. Both Durability Planning and Durability Management are mandated prerequisites. The project will also achieve the optional credit for providing Third Party Durability Management Verification.
  3. Innovative or Regional Design
    1. For a variety of reasons, the Teran project did not seek any of these credits as special compensation was not required. These credits must be approved by USGBC and take time to go through the approval process.

 Location & Linkages (LL)

The Location & Linkages category rewards projects based on the location of the site with respect to availability of existing infrastructure, transportation and community services. The main intent is for the project to be advantaged through existing services. Urban development and redevelopment are, understandably, prized goals with all LEED rating systems.

  1. LEED for Neighborhood Development
    1. The Teran project does not qualify for this credit.
  2. Site Selection
    1. This project met all the requirements: above the FEMA 100 year floodplain; not built on habitat for threatened or endangered species; not built within 100 feet of water, including wetlands; not built on land that was public parkland prior to acquisition; not built on lands with prime soils, unique soils, or soils of state significance.
  3. Preferred Locations
    1. The project was benefitted by being both an infill site and had been previously developed.
  4. Infrastructure
    1. All water and sewer services were located at the site.
  5. Community Resources / Transit
    1. Although public transit opportunities are non-existent in this community, an abundance of community services are within ¼ to ½ mile uninterrupted walking distance.
  6. Access to Open Space
    1. A small community with very narrow sites, the area provides an abundance of community or public open space opportunities within ½ mile walking distance and ¾ acres in size.

Sustainable Sites (SS)

While Location & Linkages addresses the location of the site, the Sustainable Sites category rewards the project for minimizing adverse environmental impacts to the site due to related building construction design and activities.

  1. Site Stewardship
    1. The project benefitted here due to the fact the site is less than 1/7 of an acre. Additionally, the Erosion Controls During Construction prerequisite are being met.
  2. Landscaping
    1. The landscaping will be designed to: not use invasive plants as per the prerequisite requirement; all turf will be draught tolerant; no turf will be used in densely shaded areas; no turf will be used on slopes greater than 25%; mulch or soil amendments will be used as appropriate; all compacted soil will be tilled at least 6 inches. Additionally, the overall irrigation demand will be reduced by at least 20%.
  3. Reduce Local Heat Island Effects
    1. 50% of the hardscapes will be light colored, high albedo materials.
  4. Surface Water Management
    1. Due to the existing site restraints and slope conditions, the only part of this credit that could be achieved is planting trees, shrubs or ground cover as permanent erosion control measures.
  5. Nontoxic Pest Control
    1. The following pest control measures are being implemented: seal external cracks and joints with caulking and install pest-proof screens; include no wood-to-concrete connections or separate connections with dividers; install landscaping so mature plants are 24 inches from the home; use solid concrete foundations.
  6. Compact Development
    1. This project qualifies by building a single home on 1/10 acre, or less.

Water Efficiency (WE)

It has been said that due to the projected increase in population and decrease in our fresh water supplies, water may become the next natural resource to be as coveted, guarded and fought over as oil. Water conservation has become more urgent only during the last few years. The Water Efficiency category addresses water conservation by three (3) types of credits.

  1. Water Reuse
    1. Due to site restrictions and limitations and the fact that there is no Municipal Recycled Water System available, this credit was not attempted.
  2. Irrigation System
    1. The overall irrigation demand will be reduced by at least 45%.
  3. Indoor Water Use
    1. The toilets will be high-efficiency and meet the EPA Water Sense specification; the faucets will be very high-efficiency and meet the EPA Water Sense specification.

Energy & Atmosphere (EA)

The Energy & Atmosphere category is primarily focused on reducing our dependence on fossil fuels by reducing our energy consumption. Additionally, this category addresses the adverse environmental impacts caused by the use of certain refrigerants.

There are two (2) pathway options available for the Energy & Atmosphere category: Performance and Prescriptive. The Teran project is following the Performance pathway and will be required to comply with credits EAc1, EAc7 and EAc11.

  1. Optimize Energy Performance
    1. The ENERGY STAR requirements will be met as per the prerequisite.
    2. In a 4 IECC Climate Zone, the project will achieve a HERS Index Rating of 70 to meet the Exceptional Energy Performance credit.
  2. For the prescriptive pathway option
  3. For the prescriptive pathway option
  4. For the prescriptive pathway option
  5. For the prescriptive pathway option
  6. For the prescriptive pathway option
  7. Water Heating
    1. Due to the dimensions of the home, a compact conventional design is not possible.
  8. For the prescriptive pathway option
  9. For the prescriptive pathway option

10.  For the prescriptive pathway option

11.  Residential Refrigerant Management

  1. The prerequisite requires a Refrigerant Charge Test
  2. For the optional credit, only non-HCFC refrigerants will be used.

Materials & Resources (MR)

The Materials & Resources category addresses the impact of material selections to our natural resources, as well as our health. Implementing proper framing strategies, selecting sustainable materials, reclaimed materials and regional materials not only conserve natural resources but reduce adverse environmental impacts due to harvesting, manufacturing and transportation. Selection of low VOC materials reduces the release of toxic chemicals inside the home.

  1. Material Efficient Framing
    1. The prerequisite requires a limit of the overall framing waste factor to 10% or less
    2. All floor, wall and roof components will be prefabricated off-site. The floor and roof members are open web trusses, cut to length and the exterior/interior walls will be panelized construction. This complies with the requirements necessary to pick up the maximum credit points allowed.
  2. Environmentally Preferred Products
    1. No tropical wood will be installed.
    2. The gypsum board installed on the walls and ceilings will be EPP, the interior paint will be low emission and foundation aggregate and cement, gypsum board and exterior deck materials will be local production.
  3. Waste Management
    1. The prerequisite requires the project to document the diversion rate for construction waste.
    2. All construction waste will be diverted from landfills either by a % or weight/volume method.

Indoor Environmental Quality (EQ)

With Americans spending, on average, 90% of their time indoors, where pollution levels can be as high as 100 times worse than levels outside the home, the Indoor Environmental Quality category is critically important and the entire category is focused on improving indoor health and comfort.

  1. ENERGY STAR with Indoor Air Package
    1. The Teran project will comply with this credit by meeting the requirements of USEPA’s Indoor airPLUS as a replacement for Indoor Air Package method.
  2. Combustion Venting
    1. The prerequisite, Basic Combustion Venting Measures, will be met by: installing no unvented combustion appliances, installing carbon monoxide monitors on each floor, installing doors on all fireplaces and installing power vented exhaust on all space and water heating equipment.
    2. The optional credit, Enhanced Combustion Venting Measures, will be met by: installing listed, power or direct vented or fixed doors on all fireplaces and stoves and providing electronic pilots on fireplaces and stoves.
  3. Moisture Control
    1. No dehumidification systems are being installed.
  4. Outdoor Air Ventilation
    1. The prerequisite, Basic Outdoor Air Ventilation, will be achieved through continuous
    2. An optional credit will be achieved by performing Third Party Performance testing ventilation
  5. Local Exhaust
    1. The prerequisite, Basic Local Exhaust, requires: bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans to meet ASHRAE 62.2 air flow requirement, fans and ducts be designed and installed to ASHRAE 62.2, air to be exhausted to the outdoors and bathroom exhaust fans be ENERGY STAR labeled.
    2. The optional credit, Enhanced Local Exhaust will be met by installing continuously operating exhaust fans in the bathrooms
    3. Another optional credit will be achieved by performing Third Party Performance testing
  6. Distribution of Space Heating and cooling
    1. The prerequisite will be met for conducting room-by-room load calculations according to ACCA Manual J & D.
  7. Air Filtering
    1. The prerequisite requires Good Filters be installed with a MERV value of 8 or greater.
  8. Contaminant Control
    1. The Indoor Contaminant Control credit will be achieved by installing a coat rack and shoe shelf in the Garage, at the door leading into the Laundry Room
  9. Radon Protection
    1. This site is located in a high risk area, therefore Radon-Resistant Construction is a mandated prerequisite. Under slab gravel and vapor barrier has been installed, a crock has been installed with a PVC line to the outside, terminating above the roof line, and an electrical outlet located near the crock in the event a power pump will be required after radon testing has been completed.

10.  Garage Pollution Protection

  1. The prerequisite requires no HVAC be installed in the Garage
  2. The optional credit, Minimize Pollutants from Garage, will be met by: sealing all penetrations and connections between the Garage and adjoining conditioned spaces, installing carbon monoxide detector in the Laundry Room adjoining the Garage and weather stripping the Laundry Room door adjoining the garage.

Awareness & Education (AE)

The LEED for Homes Rating System addresses the design and construction of new green homes. However, in order to maintain the continued high performing qualities of a green home, the owner has responsibilities they must be made aware of. The Awareness and Education category addresses this concern by mandating the Education of the Homeowner or Tenant Basic Operations Training prerequisite. This requires the builder to prepare and review an Operations and Maintenance Manual and conduct a minimum one hour walkthrough with the owner or tenant.

Additionally, credits are available for Enhanced Training and Public Awareness. With Public Awareness, the builder must meet 3 of the 4 options: have an open house on at least 4 weekends, market the benefits of LEED Homes on their website, have a local newspaper publish an article about the home, and display LEED signage on the exterior of the home.

Benefits Summary: Teran Residence

    • Integrated Project Team and Planning: protects the integrity of green design strategies and heads off potential cost overruns to inadequate communication and coordination
    • Durability Planning and Management: ensures increased life expectancy of building design and materials susceptible to premature failure
    • Location and Linkages: reduces the burden on our natural resources by building in areas where existing infrastructure can be used
    • Sustainable Sites: provides stewardship over the site as well as adjoining communities
    • Water Efficiency: reduces water consumption; reduces energy demand by requiring less hot water and electrical support for irrigation systems
    • Energy & Atmosphere: reduces energy consumption and the release of harmful refrigerants into the atmosphere
    • Materials & Resources: protects natural resources by careful selection of materials; improves indoor air quality by using low emission finishes (VOC); reduces the burden on landfills by managing construction waste
    • Indoor Environmental Quality: provides increased insulation and air infiltration sealing; increases and controls ventilation and exhaust; reduces indoor pollutants and controls contaminants




Teran Residence – the LEED verification process

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Due to the extreme amount of site work and structural piering required, construction contracts are awarded early to the contractors necessary to get this work underway. Construction began while the Project Checklist was being finalized.

LEED for Homes requires regularly scheduled integrated team meetings, so a second project team meeting was scheduled for a final review of the Project Checklist, Durability Inspection Checklist and construction documents. The next integrated project team meeting will take place after insulation and prior to drywall. This is also the time for the first of two required inspections from the Green Raters. The final Green Rater inspection will be after project completion, unless the builder requires an additional meeting sooner.

The Durability Inspection Checklist requires both the Green Rater and the responsible team member sign off on each of the selected strategies . Since many of these durability items will be covered up when the exterior cladding and interior drywall is installed, the builder can provide date stamped photographs to the verification team (Green Raters). This begins with photos taken of the foundation drainage system, under slab gravel, vapor barrier, foundation moisture proofing, etc. and continues until all items have been documented.

 

 

 




Teran Residence – Durability Photos

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To view the current Teran Residence Durability Evaluation Inspection Checklist Photo file, follow me »